2018 Conference - Faculty

Melissa Cheng, MD – Assistant Professor, Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, University of Utah School of Medicine.  Dr Cheng earned a Masters in Health Science in the department of International Health with an emphasis on complex humanitarian emergencies at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Medicine.  She works at the University of Utah’s Rocky Mountain Center for Occupational and Environmental Health.  Her research focus is opioid medication usage among working populations.Back to Main Conference Page

 

2018 Conference Faculty

Patrick Carrol, MD 

Dr. Carroll is a neonatologist and Medical Director of Newborn Medicine and Pediatrics with Intermountain Healthcare at Dixie Regional Medical Center in St. George, Utah.  Dr. Carroll has published research on thermoregulation, gastroschisis, and decreasing phlebotomy in the NICU with particular interest in utilization of cord blood for admission laboratory testing in neonates.  He has also participated in creating online performance improvement modules with the American Academy Pediatrics and American Board of Pediatrics.

Robert Christensen, MD
Professor Pediatrics and Division Chief Neonatology, University of Utah.  He is a former Division Chief at the University of Florida and Chairman of the Department of Pediatrics at the University of South Florida.  Dr. Christensen has published over 500 articles and authored two textbooks on Neonatal Hematology.  

 

Willard Dere, MD, FACP
Professor Internal Medicine, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, University of Utah, Executive director of Personalized Health, Co-Director of the Utah Center for Clinical and Translational Science.  Twenty-five years of clinical research in the biopharmaceutical industry.    

 

Kimberly Friddle, PhD, APRN, NNP-BC
Assistant Professor and NNP Specialty Director University of Utah College of Nursing, Neonatal Nurse Practitioner and Clinical Specialist Primary Children’s Hospital.   Research focus has been on Retinopathy of Prematurity and oxygen usage as well as alarm fatigue.  

 

Camille Fung, MD
Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, University of Utah School of Medicine.  Dr. Fung’s basic science research focuses on the mechanisms behind why fetuses who suffer intrauterine growth restriction are predisposed to learning and memory deficits in postnatal life   She has additionally developed a statewide care process model to manage the majority of infants with narcotic abstinence syndrome.  She is medical director of the Neonatal Subcommittee of the Utah Women & Newborns Quality Collaborative headed by the Utah Department of Health and the course director for the Utah Division of Occupational Licensing (DOPL) mandated opioid prescribing education.    

 

Matthew Grossman, MD
Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, Hospitalist, Quality and Safety Officer, Yale-New Haven Children’s Hospital.  Recipient of faculty, university, and Children’s Hospital Association awards for teaching and quality improvement.  Research focused on NAS.  Invited speaker at regional and national conferences and briefing at the Congressional Baby Caucus.  

 

Allison Judkins, MD
Assistant Professor of Pediatrics and neonatologist, University of Utah.  She is currently the course director for a Global Health elective in maternal-neonatal health.  Her research interests include community-based maternal-newborn health in resource poor settings, health care education, hematology, and quality improvement.  

 

Sunny Juul, MD, PhD
Professor of Pediatrics and Chief Division of Neonatology, University of Washington.  Her research has focused on improving neonatal neurodevelopmental outcomes.  She will be presenting new findings from the PENUT Trial for which she serves as PI.  This trial is designed to test whether Epo improves the outcomes of ELBW infants.

 

Joseph Kaempf, MD
Dr Kaempf is the Medical Director of CQI and Clinical research for the Providence Health system Women and Children’s Services in Portland, OR.  Dr Kaempf has a 30 year history of participating in complex CQI projects and randomized, controlled trials, and is now coordinating multi-specialty quality and value work in Obstetrics, Pediatrics, and Neonatology.  He has published widely on many topics including morbidities in premature infants, philosophy, bioethics, and advanced collaborative CQI metrics.

 

Akhil Maheshwari, MD
Professor of Pediatrics, University of South Florida.  Research is focused on mechanisms of inflammatory gut injury including leukocyte trafficking, cytokines, tight junctions, and macrophage function.  He holds 5 provisional patents for novel anti-inflammatory agents.  He is an editor of a textbook of Neonatal Hematology, Immunology, and Infectious Disease. 

Brianna Macqueen, MD
In July 2018, Dr. Macqueen will graduate from neonatal-perinatal medicine fellowship in the Division of Neonatology, University of Utah.  Dr. Macqueen’s research focuses on several areas of neonatal hematology with publications on the components of automated hematology analyzers, the iron status of newborns at risk for iron deficiency, and biomarkers of necrotizing enterocolitis.  She is the 2018 recipient of the annual David W. Smith award, presented by the Western Society for Pediatric Research, for most outstanding research by a fellow in a department of pediatrics.  

 

Lenora Marcellus, RN, PhD
Associate Professor, University of Victoria School of Nursing, collaborating scientist in the Centre for Addictions Research of British Columbia.  Publications deal with neonatal opioid withdrawal, supporting women with substance use challenges, and supporting foster families who care for these infants in a community setting. 

 

Robyn Ohls, MD
Professor of Pediatrics, Division Chief of Neonatology, and Neonatology Fellowship Program Director at the University of New Mexico.  Dr. Ohls completed has been active in clinical/translational research in fetal/neonatal hematology for over 25 years.  She is the PI of an NIH-funded multicenter study evaluating long term neurodevelopmental effects of darbepoetin and co-PI of the NICHD Neonatal Research Network at the University of New Mexico.  Her basic science research focuses on developmental regulation of gene expression in the human fetus and the impact of preterm birth on changes in gene expression. 

 

Marcela Smid MD, MA, MS
Assistant Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, University of Utah.  She is the clinical director of the SUPeRAD (Substance Use in Pregnancy – Recovery, Addiction, Dependence) specialty prenatal clinic.  Her research interests include substance abuse, opioid epidemic, maternal mental health, global health, obesity and care for women in underserved populations. 

 

John Zupancic, ScD, MD
Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Neonatologist, Associate Chief of Neonatology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.  His research is focused on economic evaluations alongside neonatal clinical trials and use of computer modeling to determine best practices.  He is the leader of the Value Initiative for VON and Chair of AAP Section on Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine.   

Melissa Cheng, MD
Assistant Professor, Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, University of Utah School of Medicine.  Dr Cheng earned a Masters in Health Science in the Department of International Health at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Medicine with an emphasis on complex humanitarian emergencies.  She works at the University of Utah’s Rocky Mountain Center for Occupational and Environmental Health.  Her research focus is opioid medication usage among working populations.